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feat(docs): add markdown linter for exercises README.md files

This commit is contained in:
Ali Afsharzadeh 2023-03-30 19:53:22 +03:30
parent 362c1b0d11
commit 382e16eb7e
9 changed files with 36 additions and 11 deletions

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.github/workflows/lint.yml vendored Normal file
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name: Lint
on:
push:
branches:
- main
pull_request:
branches:
- main
jobs:
lint:
runs-on: ubuntu-latest
steps:
- uses: actions/checkout@v3
- uses: DavidAnson/markdownlint-cli2-action@v9
with:
globs: "exercises/**/*.md"

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# MD013/line-length Line length, Expected: 80
MD013: false

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@ -6,6 +6,7 @@ The simplest form of type conversion is a type cast expression. It is denoted wi
Rust also offers traits that facilitate type conversions upon implementation. These traits can be found under the [`convert`](https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/convert/index.html) module.
The traits are the following:
- `From` and `Into` covered in [`from_into`](from_into.rs)
- `TryFrom` and `TryInto` covered in [`try_from_into`](try_from_into.rs)
- `AsRef` and `AsMut` covered in [`as_ref_mut`](as_ref_mut.rs)
@ -17,5 +18,6 @@ These should be the main ways ***within the standard library*** to convert data
## Further information
These are not directly covered in the book, but the standard library has a great documentation for it.
- [conversions](https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/convert/index.html)
- [`FromStr` trait](https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/str/trait.FromStr.html)
- [`FromStr` trait](https://doc.rust-lang.org/std/str/trait.FromStr.html)

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# Hashmaps
A *hash map* allows you to associate a value with a particular key.
You may also know this by the names [*unordered map* in C++](https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/unordered_map),
You may also know this by the names [*unordered map* in C++](https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/unordered_map),
[*dictionary* in Python](https://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries) or an *associative array* in other languages.
This is the other data structure that we've been talking about before, when

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Lifetimes tell the compiler how to check whether references live long
enough to be valid in any given situation. For example lifetimes say
"make sure parameter 'a' lives as long as parameter 'b' so that the return
value is valid".
value is valid".
They are only necessary on borrows, i.e. references,
They are only necessary on borrows, i.e. references,
since copied parameters or moves are owned in their scope and cannot
be referenced outside. Lifetimes mean that calling code of e.g. functions
can be checked to make sure their arguments are valid. Lifetimes are
can be checked to make sure their arguments are valid. Lifetimes are
restrictive of their callers.
If you'd like to learn more about lifetime annotations, the
[lifetimekata](https://tfpk.github.io/lifetimekata/) project
has a similar style of exercises to Rustlings, but is all about
If you'd like to learn more about lifetime annotations, the
[lifetimekata](https://tfpk.github.io/lifetimekata/) project
has a similar style of exercises to Rustlings, but is all about
learning to write lifetime annotations.
## Further information

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@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ Rust's macro system is very powerful, but also kind of difficult to wrap your
head around. We're not going to teach you how to write your own fully-featured
macros. Instead, we'll show you how to use and create them.
If you'd like to learn more about writing your own macros, the
If you'd like to learn more about writing your own macros, the
[macrokata](https://github.com/tfpk/macrokata) project has a similar style
of exercises to Rustlings, but is all about learning to write Macros.

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# Options
Type Option represents an optional value: every Option is either Some and contains a value, or None, and does not.
Type Option represents an optional value: every Option is either Some and contains a value, or None, and does not.
Option types are very common in Rust code, as they have a number of uses:
- Initial values
- Return values for functions that are not defined over their entire input range (partial functions)
- Return value for otherwise reporting simple errors, where None is returned on error

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# Smart Pointers
In Rust, smart pointers are variables that contain an address in memory and reference some other data, but they also have additional metadata and capabilities.
Smart pointers in Rust often own the data they point to, while references only borrow data.

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@ -7,13 +7,13 @@ Data types can implement traits. To do so, the methods making up the trait are d
In this way, traits are somewhat similar to Java interfaces and C++ abstract classes.
Some additional common Rust traits include:
- `Clone` (the `clone` method)
- `Display` (which allows formatted display via `{}`)
- `Debug` (which allows formatted display via `{:?}`)
Because traits indicate shared behavior between data types, they are useful when writing generics.
## Further information
- [Traits](https://doc.rust-lang.org/book/ch10-02-traits.html)